Exterior Tudor Architectural Features

Exterior Tudor Architectural Features
Exterior Tudor Architectural Features

 

If you are lucky enough to live in a Tudor house, whether it be a small, “chocolate box” cottage in the country or a larger, more impressive house fit for the Lord of the Manor, then you will be familiar with many of the external features of houses of this time.

Original Tudor houses were constructed of natural materials, which could usually be locally sourced, like oak, stone, brick and slate. Larger houses may have heavy stone porch surrounds and stone window surrounds and stone mullions. Most Tudor houses, large or small, would have a heavy, wooden door, usually made of oak, complete with heavy, black ironmongery. Steep, gabled roofs of slate (or possibly a thatched roof on rural dwellings) and iconic half-timbering are also typical of Tudor houses.

dormer-window-103465_1280Diamond or rectangular leaded glass windows are also a distinct feature. The reason why Tudor windows were made of such small pieces of glass is that it was too difficult to make large panes. However, as beautiful stained glass found its way into the churches of the time, it also became popular in the houses of the rich merchants and the gentry. Often great halls and stairways had windows with sun catcher portraits or with heraldic designs displayed among the glass panels.

If your Tudor home requires maintenance to the windows or needs a replacement window then there are specialist companies which will be able to help. The first steps are to look online and to ask neighbours with a similar style of house for recommendations.